What formats are there, and when do you use them?

What formats are there, and when do you use them?

Many people think of interviewing as the widely used method in which the interviewer asks questions to the interviewee. But there are other ways to interview. In this blog, I'll give you some examples. Interviewing.


1. Mindmapping

Ask your respondents to write down as much information as possible concerning a central topic. Give your respondent(s) enough time to do this, and then discuss the mind map together.

The advantage of mind mapping is that you give respondents the freedom to map out their thoughts and provide them with the opportunity to come up with unexpected ideas. This way, you open doors during the interview that would otherwise remain closed.

2. Post-it

At a few points during the interview, ask your respondents to summarize the interview up to this point in keywords on post-it notes. Ask them to structure these notes. At the end of the interview, discuss the content and structure of the post-it notes. Because you let the respondents structure the interview themselves and allow them to respond immediately, you increase the validity of your research.

3. Use existing (visual) material

During the interview, you let the respondent(s) react to an image, film, sound clip, or data. After an initial reaction, you can use the material to ask various questions or start a (group) discussion.
The use of various resources makes an interview livelier. The conversation becomes different by talking about something tangible in front of you or something you just watched together. By waiting for the reactions, you can get unexpected responses.

4. Fill in a schedule or timeline together

you can structure your interview with a plan or timeline that you make up together. Respondents can thus structure their experience, opinion, and knowledge. During the interview, black holes stand out that you can fill in or explain together. If the time frame is extensive, you can use a white roll of wallpaper in a group interview. That way, everyone has insight into the timeline.
Respondents will make highlights while filling in a schedule or timeline. It helps respondents when they can work visually assisted.

Do you want more tips on conducting an interview? Also read my other blogs: How can you increase the response rate for a survey?Tips for formulating survey questions